The Scream

The Scream

The romantic notion of the artist, as someone who lives, works, and ultimately, thrives in isolation is one that just about everyone is familiar with, it is a concept that produces great artists, such as Van Gogh and Picasso, Mozart and Beethoven, F.W. Murnau and Francois Truffaut – all of these artists produce produce singular objects that are recognized as outstanding art forms in their respective artistic mediums.  Coincidentally, these ideas also fit into a 19th and 20th century perspective on how art is made and circulated, as well as how it is received and appreciated by an audience.  In the 21st century, artists and media makers are finding that they need to approach their art in ways that would have been strange, unintelligible, and in some cases, outrageously wrong during the previous two centuries.  Given this momentous shift, from a physically embodied experience of art, where the viewer engages with the art’s aura in an almost religious (or miraculous) way, can our experiences of art be as significant for us now, or are we left with the possibility of a loss of art and the meaning that art has held for those who engage with it?  What claims from Benjamin, McCloud, and Fallows could be used to develop and support your own position?

 

A New Type of Portraiture

A New Type of Portraiture

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