Focus bounces from task to task in modern-day digital world

Focus bounces from task to task in modern-day digital world

The technological evolution that has happened, and continues to advance as we speak has brought about a different psychological approach to the way we learn, absorb, and study information.  The arguments of the three authors are very persuasive as I can cite many instances of the effects the Internet has on how our brains work.  For example, anytime I sit down at the computer with one task in mind, it is nearly impossible for me to stay on that same page for an extended period of time.  In “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” Bruce Friedman says he experiences difficulty with reading and absorbing “longish” articles in print or online.  Also, in “Learning to think in a digital world” Maryanne Wolf raises an interesting question through the philosophy of Socrates, whether having access to the Internet will impair the imagination of our youth, or will it help in multitasking and prioritizing skills to better our society?  The answer to this question is still remains to be seen.  It is difficult to see specific neurological effects on society because technology is always constantly improving.

The way the brain has adjusted to the demands of the digital world

The way the brain has adjusted to the demands of the digital world

In regard to technology, all three articles shared quite similar opinions.  All three writers recognize that technology is largely transforming the way we communicate and learn.  With the Internet the writers agree, the way we read now is much different than the past.  In “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” the new way to read involves reading small amounts of text or skimming from page to page on the Internet as opposed to sitting down and reading through an entire article.   However, there were notable differences on the writers’ stance on education.  In “Learning to think in a digital world” Maryanne Wolf, says that children must have a strong knowledge of reading before venturing out into the digital world.  This contrasts starkly with Richard E. Miller in “The Coming Apocalypse”.  Miller believes the texts read in school are largely outdated and believes digital media should play a much greater role in education.  While Wolf believes we need to have a “true knowledge” away from ideas on the web, Miller encourages the sharing of ideas and the early use of digital media.

New use for books because no longer read

New use for books because they are no longer read

 

I find myself agreeing with Richard E. Miller more than the other two writers.  Fresh out of high school, having read ancient literature throughout my senior year, I completely agree with his argument about the texts read in schools being outdated.  With technology and the Internet, there is a whole platform of information that is going completely untapped if we stick only to the books.  In other words, why ignore the ever-improving digital media in schools?  Also, seeing that digital media is increasingly being read while the reading of all other platforms of writing is down really shows where our society is headed.  Having Miller put all the facts in to this article about the extinction of the post of office, and how writing on paper is becoming a thing of the past really drives home the point that digital media is transforming our world.  However, I believe this is change is most definitely for the best.  Having access to more and more information, or sharing everyone’s ideas together (mentioned in the article) seems like an innovative way to go about utilizing today’s modern digital media.  Overall, I found Miller’s ideas to be a more modern take on digital media, and the proposed ways to use it I believe will benefit society far more than hurt it.

 

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